Vocabulary Word of the Week: Anemometer

Our vocab word of the day is Meteorologists. Meteorologists are scientists who study the weather and that’s exactly what you can do with our DIY!

Have you ever wondered how your scientists know how fast the wind is moving, one tool they can use is an anemometer! Today, we are going to show you how to make and use your own.

An anemometer is a tool used by meteorologists to measure wind speed and direction.

An anemometer is a tool used by meteorologists to measure wind speed and direction.

Materials:

  1. 5 paper cups

  2. 2 straws

  3. 1 push pin

  4. 1 pencil

  5. 1 hole puncher or a pair of scissors

Method:

  1. Hole punch (or make holes with scissors) 4 evenly spaced holes around the edge of one of the paper cups. Make another hole in the bottom of the cup that is the same size as your pencil.

  2. Insert a straw through 1 hole and out the one on the opposite side. Do the same with the other straw so that they overlap and create an X in the middle of the cup.

  3. Put the pencil, eraser side up,  through the bottom hole of the cup. The eraser should touch the X made of the straws.

  4. Put the push pin in the middle of the X. It should go through the 2 straws and the pencil eraser.

  5. Create 2 holes in each of the other 4 cups. The holes should be parallel to each other and be the same distance away from the edge of the cup.

  6. Place the cups on the straws sticking out of the central cup. The straws will pass through the 2 holes. Make sure the cups are all facing the same direction!

  7. Bring your anemometer outside on a windy day. Hold it and watch it spin!

This is what your anemometer will look like when completed.

This is what your anemometer will look like when completed.

How to use your anemometer?

  1. On a day with no wind, have an adult drive down your street at 10 miles per hour.

  2. Hold the anemometer outside of the window and count the number of rotations it makes in 30 seconds. You may want to mark one of the cups so you are sure it has made a full rotation.

  3. The number of rotations counted is about how many rotations would occur at wind speeds of 10 miles per hour. In the future, you can compare your collected data with this calibrated speed. To make it even more accurate, you can do the previous test at several different speeds and make a table of your results!

[jwplayer mediaid=”3327″]

Maariyah Mustafa

&

Natalie Duerr

Leave a Reply